Archive for the ‘American Idioms’ category

Idiom – “eyes were bigger than my stomach”

April 26th, 2015

Definition:
This means that one has put more food on their plate than they can eat.

Example:
Wife to husband at dinner“I served myself way too much food.  I think my eyes were bigger than my stomach.”

Idiom – “the last straw (that broke the camel’s back)”

April 11th, 2015

Definition:
The final problem or difficulty in a series that now calls for an immediate response.  (From the image of a camel loaded with so much weight that one more straw will break the camel’s back.)
Example:
MotherSheryl is out with her friends for the fourth time this week, and she is past her curfew again.
FatherThis is the last straw.  She is grounded for the rest of the month

Idiom – “bend over backwards”

March 16th, 2015

Definition:
This means to work very hard to accomplish something or to please someone.

Example:
Singer to director “You will not be disappointed in hiring me.  You can depend on me at any time.  I will bend over backwards to make this production a big, big success!

Idiom – “a slap on the wrist”

February 6th, 2015

Definition:
This refers to a warning or mild punishment that is not severe.

Example:
Father “I am grounding our son for a week because he went to a party again without our permission.”
Mother – “That punishment is just a slap on the wrist. He needs to be grounded for two weeks, no cell phone use and no allowance.”

Idiom – “at each other’s throats”

February 6th, 2015

Definition:
This idiom is used to describe a strong verbal disagreement between two people.

Example:
Father – “I can hear those two girls arguing from across the street.”

Mother“Your daughters have been at each at each other’s throats all morning, arguing about whose turn it is to clean the bathroom.”

Idiom – “their bark is worse than their bite”

January 23rd, 2015

Definition:
When someone talks tough and makes threats, but does not take action.

Example:
Baseball player 1 “Wow, coach says we’ll have to practice all weekend because we lost the game.
Baseball player 2Don’t worry about coach.  His bark is always worse than his bite.“

 

Idiom – “a day late and a dollar short”

October 16th, 2014

Definition:
This implies that the current effort attempted is not enough and much too late to change the circumstances.

Example:
Friend A on phone – Can I speak to Susie?  I want to apologize to her about my terrible temper tantrum yesterday.  It was wrong of me to yell at her for something she didn’t do.

Friend B answers – Well you’re a day late and a dollar short.  She flew back home this morning because she said she has had enough of your temper tantrums.

Idiom – “don’t count your chickens before they hatch”

June 29th, 2014

Definition:
This means that you should not be too confident or optimistic about your plans succeeding before you see the results.

Example:
Son“The interview went really well, and I’m positive they will give me the job by next week.  So I’m going to celebrate tonight and buy that electric guitar that’s on sale.”
Father“Don’t count your chickens before they hatch, son… just wait until you are offered the job.

Idiom – “never look a gift horse in the mouth”

June 29th, 2014

Definition:
When receiving a gift do not question or criticize the gift too closely, just be appreciative.

Example:
Daughter The diamond earrings Aunt Sally gave me are too small.  You can hardly seem them!
Mother – Never look a gift horse in the mouth, now send your Aunt Sally a thank you card.

Idiom – “a taste of your own medicine”

June 11th, 2014

Definition:
This refers to being mistreated the same way in which you mistreated someone else.

Example:
Friend (1) “My boyfriend is so upset that he hasn’t talked to me the last two days.  It’s driving me crazy.
Friend (2) – “Ah ha!  Now you know what it feels like.  You are getting a taste of your own medicine!